British report points to deep segregation of the Muslim community

ANDY RAIN

Muslims rally outside Regents Park mosque in London, 03 April 2015. Radical preacher, Anjem Choudary, who addressed the rally, called for muslims to refrain from voting in the forthcoming general election in May claiming it is strictly forbidden in Islam.

British report points to deep segregation of the Muslim community


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British Muslims are socially and economically segregated, thereby becoming ideal candidates for recruitment from extremist groups according to a government-sponsored report.

The policy paper was authored by Dame Louise Casey and reflects more than a year of research and consultation. Muslim communities, particularly those originating from Pakistan and Bangladesh, are more likely to live in segregated urban centers. Living in regions with a concentration of as much as 85% — in places like Bradford and Birmingham – accentuates the failure to integrate them linguistically and culturally, particularly women.

Speaking to the BBC, the senior civil servant acknowledged that the U.K.’s 2,8 million Muslims do face pressure from Islamophobia, but has underscored the dangers emanating from social exclusion for the rise of extremism.

Communities Minister Sajid Javid recognized the report as a “valuable contribution.” But, the chief executive of the Ramadhan Foundation Muslim advocacy group called the report “inflammatory and divisive.”

The report was commissioned by the former Prime Minister, David Cameron, in July 2015. It has not been published immediately, as government officials sought to water down its findings.

The report urges public institutions not to tolerate misogyny and patriarchy in the name of cultural tolerance.

Among other policy measures, the report recommends mandatory English classes – whose funding has been cut – as well as the introduction of a citizenship test and an oath to British values. She also called for targeted inter-communal initiatives that will promote integration, such as sports activities.

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