Brexit talks “should” accelerate, but it’s not certain they will

British Prime Minister Theresa May (C) and EU Commissioner President Jean-Claude Juncker (2-R)at the end of a meeting in Brussels, Belgium, 16 October 2017. Theresa May met over dinner with Michel Barnier, the European Chief Negotiator of the Task Force for the Preparation and Conduct of the Negotiations with the United Kingdom under Article 50. in Brussels, Belgium, 16 October 2017. EPA-EFE/OLIVIER HOSLET

Brexit talks “should” accelerate, but it’s not certain they will


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The official dinner between the British Prime Minister Theresa May and the President of the European Commission Jean-Claude Juncker on Monday had no ground-breaking result.

In a common statement both sides said that it was still possible for Brexit negotiations should “accelerate over the months to come.”

Theresa May’s dash to Brussels on Monday was aimed at breaking the current negotiating deadlock.

In a speech in Florence two weeks ago, May proposed that the UK should remain in the Single Market for a two-year transitional period. During that period, the UK would be contributing to the EU budget. However, that compromise was not enough to move forward with negotiations on a future trade partnership.

Brussels insists that the UK must make a commitment to a so-called financial settlement, undertaking to honour obligations undertaken by the 28 member states. The so-called “divorce bill” must be settled before moving on to negotiate future trade relations.

Monday’s dinner was framed by Theresa May’s spokesman as “a reflection” on the Florence speech, while a European Commission source told Reuters that this was to be “a very expensive dinner,” or nothing.

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