Average temperatures across Northern Hemisphere breach 2 degrees Celsius limit

EPA/NICK COBBING / GREENPEACE / HANDOUT

High temperatures at the Northern Hemisphere were expected as the Arctic in particular experienced terrific warmth throughout the winter.

On 3 March, the average temperature of the world’s Northern Hemisphere breached the 2 degrees Celsius above “normal” mark for the first time in recorded history.


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For the first time in history, the average temperature of the world’s Northern Hemisphere breached the 2 degrees Celsius above “normal” mark, for a few hours, according to a report by Slate’s Future Tense.

Eric Holthaus a meteorologist who writes about weather and climate for Slate’s Future Tense wrote that as of Thursday morning the under the 2 degrees Celsius aim, agreed at the UN Paris Climate Change Conference was already breached at the Northern Hemisphere.

According to the scientists if global temperature rise above 2 degrees Celsius then it will be “dangerous” for mankind and Earth. Holthaus wrote “It’s now arrived—though very briefly—much more quickly than anticipated. This is a milestone moment for our species. Climate change deserves our greatest possible attention.”

High temperatures at the Northern Hemisphere were expected as the Arctic in particular experienced terrific warmth throughout the winter. Temperatures at the North Pole approached 0C in late December being – 30C to 35C above average.

Mark Serreze, the director of the US National Snow and Ice Data Centre, described the conditions as “absurd” and told the British Daily, The Guardian, “The heat has been unrelenting over the entire season…I’ve been studying Arctic climate for 35 years and have never seen anything like this before.”

The Guardian also spoke to Professor Michael Mann, the director of Penn State Earth System Science Centre and he said that the climate change was not due to the El Niño phenomenon. “A number of folks have done this (correlation between El Niño and increased temperature),” he said, “and come to the conclusion it (the El Niño) was responsible for less than 0.1C of the anomalous warmth. In other words, we would have set an all-time global temperature record [in 2015] even without any help from El Niño.”

Bill McKibben founder of the climate campaign 350.org, and the Schumann Distinguished Scholar in Environmental Studies at Middlebury College wrote an opinion piece at Boston Globe and said:

“The messages are clear. First, global warming is not a future threat — it’s the present reality, a menace not to our grandchildren but to our present civilizations…Second, since we’re in a hole it’s time to stop digging — literally. We’ve simply got to keep coal and oil and gas in the ground.”

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