Austerity and Democracy are not compatible

EPA/RODONG SINMUN

The practices of the North Korean leader may inspire our gurus how to secure the status quo in the European Union.

Austerity and Democracy are not compatible


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Martin Schulz proudly said that the victory of Alexander Van der Bellen “is a heavy defeat of nationalism and anti-European, backward-looking populism”. This is the biggest joke of the year. I’d like to know from the good ex-president of our Parliament, who was his professor…

Indeed, in all his enthusiasm he did not take into account that while just a few plus half of Austrians voted for the Green candidate, the other half minus a few voted for the far -right. This is the ugly reality of Austria which means that the new Adolph is ante portas, unless there will be a swift and rapid policy change.

Because the truth is that the far-right is producing Adolphs, but its voters are neither neo-Nazis nor Fascists. They are the once middle-class, but now the nouveau-poor who have been pushed below the poverty line by the establishment.

The Austrian vote was a vote primarily against the immigrants and the immigration policies of the EU.

The “No” vote in Italy’s referendum was different and was not a vote against Matteo Renzi. Indeed, it was the timing and context of the referendum wrong. As to the European Commission was wrong to keep distances from Renzi because now, it will have to deal with the “Grillisti.” Indeed, with the right advice, the young Florentine politician most probably would not have called for the referendum. As to Matteo Renzi, for Berlaymont may soon become “Midsummer Night’s Dream.” Rebel leaders is the new reality show for Europe and it is something the Brussels gurus must learn to live with.

In Italy, the poor people voted “No”. Rich areas like Trentino or Italians abroad, voted “Yes.” In the case of Italy, it was austerity that ordinary people voted against. Same is true for most EU member states. Let’s just wait and see what will happen in a few months’ time in France. Europe – the way it was dreamed by the Germans and the Commission nomenclatura – is over. It’s kaput.

Europe is turning upside-down and this is good because eventually those few politicians left in Europe should have heeded the message. This is also good because now almost everybody can realise that we are one step from the cliff and the only way to clear it is to fly over.

Unfortunately, none of our leaders have realised what has happened in America with Donald Trump. It was not just Hillary Clinton who was defeated, but the “establishment”. And by the looks of it, it was defeated peacefully and orderly. Americans are disciplined citizens. Compared to their European ancestors, Americans may lack in sophistication and culture but democracy and freedom are religious values and are deeply rooted in their genes. Here in Europe, everything is negotiable.

Now Europe is following the winds of change blowing from the other side of the Atlantic. Europeans like the idea and they want to get rid of their “establishment”. Citizens are fed-up with austerity and over-regulation and begun reacting, peacefully, with their vote. For the time being.

As the situation becomes tenser and more critical, it seems that two options are left for the survival of the European Union. Either, reverse austerity flooding small businesses with (inflated) money and abolish over-regulation and any kind of controls for small enterprises. Or, make a new Treaty providing for obligatory successive elections and referenda all over the Union, until the desired outcome is democratically approved. We have seen this already in Ireland and in Denmark, while some ideas we can get from the North Korean leader Kim Jong-un.

Austerity and democracy are not compatible, but everything is possible in our Union, except the impossible. This, takes some time.

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