Archeologists believe they discovered the remains of Buddha

NARENDRA SHRESTHA

The damaged Nepalese heritage site Syambhunaath Stupa, also known as the Monkey Temple, deserted on Buddha's birthday following the deadly earthquake, in Kathmandu, Nepal, 04 May 2015. Nepalese Buddhist devotees will not visit Syambhunaath Stupa - a main pilgrimage site on Buddha's birthday, due to safety concerns following the earthquake. The official death toll climbed to over 7,200, according to Nepal Emergency Operation Center, but is expected to be rise higher as more victims are recorded in remote regions.

Archeologists believe they discovered the remains of Buddha


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A Chinese archaeological team discovered a 1000-years old sandalwood-gold-silver-ceramic box inside a stone casket in a crypt in the Grand Bao’en Temple, China.

The inscriptions on the box suggest it contains Buddha’s remains, who dies approximately 2500 years ago. Explaining the providence of the remains, the inscriptions suggest that two monks, Yunjiang and Zhiming, collected over 2,000 pieces of cremated remains over a period of two decades and buried them in the temple in 1013. The finding includes a skull bone.

The discovery was first published in the Journal of Chinese Cultural Relics and is signed by the archaeologist Hon Wu, of the Gansu Provincial Institute of Cultural relics and Archaeology. It was then republished in the Chinese Cultural Relics journal, LiveScience, and followed up by Archaeology.

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