Second tomb behind Tut’s chamber established

STR

An interior view of the King Tutankhamun burial chamber in the Valley of the Kings, Luxor, Egypt, 28 November 2015. Scanning works were conducted inside King Tutankhamun's Tomb for two days. The country's Minister of Antiquities, Dr. Mamdouh Eldamaty, said at a press conference on 28 November 2015 that the preliminary results of the radar scans indicated the existence of an unknown burial chamber behind that of the Boy King's. British archaeologist Nicholas Reeves believes that the new chamber could be the last resting place of Queen Nefertiti, King Tut's mother-in-law.

There is speculation that this could be Nefertiti’s tomb, but there is little doubt there is something there


Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Google+
Share on LinkedIn
+

A radar examination of Tutankhamn’s tomb that began in September 2015 has now been completed. A secret lingering for more than 3,000 years is close to being revealed. Behind the chambers of Tut’s tomb, there is another secret chamber.  It is speculated that this could be the tomb of Queen Nefertiti; what is now mostly certain is that there is something there.

For months, the results of a full radar examination of Tutankhamun’s tomb were expected. For years archaeologists believed that Tutankhamun’s tomb was smaller than one would expect for an Egyptian King, but there is a suspicion his tomb may be just the extension of a tomb designed for Nefertiti.

During a press conference last Thursday, Egyptian authorities revealed that there are both hidden chambers and unidentified objects behind the tomb discovered in 1922.

Discovered in 1922 in the famous Valley of the Kings, the tomb was one of the most intact ever discovered in Egypt and, subsequently, one of the most studied. Apparently, it had more secrets to reveal. Nicholas Reeves, a British archaeologist, first came up with the hypothesis there is a second tomb on the same site, which he substantiated on the basis of high-resolution scans that indicated there were closed passageways and door openings in Tut’s chamber.

Apparently, given the sudden death of the King, the ready-made chambers of a member of the family were used. The thesis was initially dismissed, but radar results seem to present near-conclusive evidence. Thursday’s press conference was based on a full report of radar examination by a Japanese specialist, Remy Hiramoto. By radiating electromagnetic pulses scientists were able to distinguish between both organic and non-organic (metal) objects.

Tutankhamun reigned for nine years and died at the age of 18. He was the son of king Akhenaten and his sister, a royal concubine. He was succeeded on the throne by general Horemheb.

(National Geographic, The Independent)

Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Google+
Share on LinkedIn
+